Japan will reportedly inspect some 200 million network-connected devices ahead of the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games.

The government-backed National Institute of Information and Communications Technology will begin the sweep next month, checking for potential vulnerabilities in routers, webcams, and smart home appliances.

Ahead of this year’s Rugby World Cup and G20 summit—not to mention the 2020 Summer Olympics—host city Tokyo is eager to boost cybersecurity, according to Channel NewsAsia.

Analysts will test common-yet-unsafe IDs and passwords (like “abcd,” “1234,” “admin”) on easily hacked devices—primarily those using physical cables to access the Internet, Institute spokesman Tsutomu Yoshida told the news agency.

“Too often, we see webcams, for example, that are already being hacked because security settings are too simple and their images are being seen by outsiders,” he said. “Sometimes they are put on public websites without the owners being aware.”

While the Institute said it will eschew expensive and complex operations like checking smartphones, it may instead examine routers at cafes, for example.

“We will see, of roughly 200 million products to be surveyed, how many are being exposed to risks,” Yoshida said.

The move comes after an attack during the 2018 Winter Olympics that took down several hundred Pyeongchang computers, knocking Internet and television systems offline for 12 hours.

Authorities declined to reveal the source, but The Washington Post pointed the finger at Russia. Citing two anonymous U.S. intelligence officials, the paper tipped a “false-flag” operation, claiming the Russians tried to frame North Korea for the disruption.

Next year’s Games mark the return of the Summer Olympics to Tokyo for the first time since 1964. They will be the fourth Olympics held in Japan, and the second of three consecutive Games in East Asia—sandwiched between last year’s event in South Korea and the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing, China.